PRODUCTION INFORMATION

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In its first season, the Atlantic Repertory Company will be staging two dramas from bold and engaging artists: Abyss, written by Maria Milisavljević, and No Man Is An Island, written by Thomas Hodd. These two works challenge audiences to explore distant and disparate cultures, locales and eras to find and perhaps understand the pain, confusion and stark humanity contained within each person’s existence. Find synopses of the plays below.

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

Set near Saint John, New Brunswick, during the early summer of Black ’47, the worst year of Ireland’s Potato Famine, the historical drama No Man Is An Island seeks to re-tell the story of how a young city doctor, James Patrick Collins, answered the call to help those fleeing the tragedy. But it isn’t the overwhelming numbers of refugees that pose the greatest challenge: as an Irish Catholic immigrant, Collins quickly finds that the dire conditions on Partridge Island are no match for the persecution and close-mindedness of George Harding and his brother William, the nativist doctors working alongside Collins, who are suspicious of his skills.

As the situation on the island deteriorates, Collins realizes he must confront his persecutors or lose everything. Compounding the situation is Harding’s servant, Brighid Hurley, an ardent Irish nationalist, who begins to question Collins’ loyalty to his cultural homeland. Then there’s George Harding’s wife, Margaret, who is unsure if Collins is really the threat her husband makes him out to be, or just what the doctor ordered.

No Man Is An Island is more than a story of immigration: it’s a story of sacrifice and belief, about facing our fear of the other, and what it takes to make a community.

Written by Thomas Hodd and directed by Natasha MacLellan.

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

Set near Saint John, New Brunswick, during the early summer of Black ’47, the worst year of Ireland’s Potato Famine, the historical drama No Man Is An Island seeks to re-tell the story of how a young city doctor, James Patrick Collins, answered the call to help those fleeing the tragedy. But it isn’t the overwhelming numbers of refugees that pose the greatest challenge: as an Irish Catholic immigrant, Collins quickly finds that the dire conditions on Partridge Island are no match for the persecution and close-mindedness of George Harding and his brother William, the nativist doctors working alongside Collins, who are suspicious of his skills.

As the situation on the island deteriorates, Collins realizes he must confront his persecutors or lose everything. Compounding the situation is Harding’s servant, Brighid Hurley, an ardent Irish nationalist, who begins to question Collins’ loyalty to his cultural homeland. Then there’s George Harding’s wife, Margaret, who is unsure if Collins is really the threat her husband makes him out to be, or just what the doctor ordered.

No Man Is An Island is more than a story of immigration: it’s a story of sacrifice and belief, about facing our fear of the other, and what it takes to make a community.

Written by Thomas Hodd and directed by Natasha MacLellan.

ABYSS

MISSING. Karla Richter, 24: a loving and trusting young woman, last seen before she left for the grocery store in blue jeans, a green parka and her red rubber rain boots. The police and papers ignore the disappearance, leaving her three friends – whose roots lie in Serbia and Croatia – to discover the truth. Karla’s lover Vlado, born into terror and war, Karla’s caring roommate Sophia, and Vlado’s roommate who is Sophia’s sister, all search for their missing friend.

As the story slowly unravels, it becomes clear that all three of them have been harbouring secrets as they realize how brittle the lives they’ve built are. A search for Karla becomes a search for the self in this lyrical thriller and modern day epic cloaked in the mystery of Europe’s underworld.

This poetic thriller about a missing woman premiered (as Brandung) at the Deutsches Theater Berlin, winning the prestigious 2013 Kleist Promotional Award for Young Dramatists.

Written by Maria Milisavljević and directed by Richard Rose.